#41  
Old 04-20-2017, 09:39 PM
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tomsdiscs tomsdiscs is offline
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In regular golf, you go to the driving range more than you play on the course.

At the driving range, you go into a meditative state focusing on your mechanics/swing, hitting lots of balls, leveraging focus and repetition to train your mind and body to do and not do certain things.

In disc golf, we usually go to the course, throw 1-4 discs per hole, move on, etc. And when we arrive at the course, our heads are full of mathematical models and abstractions of physical objects and systems to rationalize, explain and predict natural phenomena, which does lend itself to remembering what was on this thread or in that video, etc.

So the secret is 3x5 cards.

Keep a stack of 3x5 cards near your computer, write down notes, put it in your pocket or disc golf bag, when you get out to the course, pull it out, load your brain with the things you want to try and focus on, then rock and roll.

It does not work as well if you type the notes into your cel phone because you will end up looking at Facebook postings, texting your friends, looking at dirty pictures, and next thing you know you are late for dinner.

Over time, you can compile a long list of notes on technique, some will endure others will not seem as important over time. Once you have your master list or set of cards, you can pick which things to work on when you are out at the course.

Ideal would be a disc golf driving range and a pocket full of 3x5 cards, maybe even throw in a video camera where you could film yourself practicing at the driving range, and alternate the camera to film you from behind, side, etc.

But we always want to throw on the course, so hard to have the discipline to go to the driving range or field where we will really focus and tune our technique.

On my 3x5 cards, the first and last entry are the same - Slow/smooth is far and on target.

In Simon's latest video with Eagle, he preaches "slow feet...", then he takes a couple really slow steps and throws it 600+.......
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  #42  
Old 04-21-2017, 02:08 AM
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Nasty Nate Nasty Nate is offline
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I got out today but it was really windy. We played Walnut Hill, which is on an old 9-hole golf course so it has a lot of big drives (for mere mortals, at least). Every hole is 400-500+ feet and there are lots of huge trees with low branches making everything a distance-placement shot. It is a tough course that is tiring.

I'm trying to be slower and smoother. I have always had more of a walk up, but my form isn't great. I'm going to start picking out points to work on in this thread. I can't wait to start learning and improving
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  #43  
Old 04-21-2017, 11:14 AM
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esc1 esc1 is offline
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Of course I try to hit my line, but I focus on one thing or another until it becomes muscle memory.. Lately, after the reach back I'm using my hips to instantiate the inward pull on the wrist before unloading the throw. HUB's bottle vid explains this well. I had to start doing this slowly and it felt weird at first but practicing and getting the timing down is worth it. I'm getting better spin and distance on the disc. I didn't realize how much I've been neglecting the hips until the day after my last throw when I was push mowing the yard.. my hips were burning mad. If you've hit a distance wall at 350-375 this is something to look at for sure. Oh, and as others have said.. whenever everything is going wrong, slowing down is key
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  #44  
Old 04-21-2017, 11:53 AM
Shamis Shamis is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eegor View Post
Unless I'm doing something that needs to be corrected, I only think of two things.

#1 Relax and stay loose. Tension causes mistakes.

#2 I draw an imaginary line on the teebox or through the mark of my lie. I know what this disc will do, so I only need to hit the line.

If I stay true to these things, I usually have a good round.

Get your form down in the field. Have a good time on the course.
Yeah, I love #2, I do that all the time
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  #45  
Old 04-24-2017, 11:18 AM
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Jimbat Jimbat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eegor View Post
#1 Relax and stay loose. Tension causes mistakes.
Played my first tournament yesterday on a pretty difficult "hit the gap" type course. Every time I didn't hit my line I could attribute it to having a tense upper body long before I even began my reachback, causing the disc to slip out early. On drives where I stayed loose, I played great.
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  #46  
Old 04-25-2017, 04:41 PM
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tdschrock1 tdschrock1 is offline
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The Target. That is all
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