#11  
Old 11-08-2017, 03:04 PM
RFrance RFrance is offline
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Here is the thread on the Deep Flight Plate (DFP) type grip. I've switched to it from the pinch as well.

https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forum...&highlight=dfp
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  #12  
Old 11-08-2017, 04:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowplastic View Post
I used to pinch the thumb onto the flight plate/rim meeting point, and I also used to pinch the thumb through the flight plate into the index finger. I thought that this pinch point would give me a pivot at the instant of release around the index finger/thumb, with the other 3 fingers acting as initial anchors. I think this is BS now...not that the grip is bad, just I don't think it is necessary for a pivot.

I moved to a deeper thumb on the flight plate grip, not because I get better thumb pressure, but because it lets me get the rim deeper into my palm and really pull the disc into my palm with my 3 anchor fingers. My index still curls under the rim and touches the flight plate rather than focusing on the inner rim. My thumb is an inch or two away from the index finger, but I still feel the disc release from index last on nearly all throws. This also has the benefit where I can have my thumb in a similar position in all disc rims, no matter if it's a speed 14 driver or a Comet.

Everyone's hand size is different so you have to sort it out. But what I think now is that you don't need a perfect thumb/index pivot point, and you should maximize the way your fingers can grip the disc in a nose down position, then deal with the thumb in a comfortable way just to add to the grip strength. Don't use the thumb to try to force a nose down position, this is just band-aiding a poor alignment in the first place.
The rest of your post sounds awesome. Disagree with the bold. But it's not forcing nose down, it's keeping the disc locked in the nose down position. I don't see how you could control the angle of release without proper thumb mechanics. Just made that phrase up.
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Old 11-08-2017, 06:30 PM
slowplastic slowplastic is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by art_vandelay View Post
The rest of your post sounds awesome. Disagree with the bold. But it's not forcing nose down, it's keeping the disc locked in the nose down position. I don't see how you could control the angle of release without proper thumb mechanics. Just made that phrase up.
I completely agree with what you are saying. The thumb is necessary to maintain the nose down angle for my grip while throwing, but if I hold the disc out with a straight arm and wrist in proper position, and have zero pressure with the thumb or "hit" point of the throw pressure with my thumb, the disc angle doesn't really change. If I didn't grip with my thumb during the throw there would be problems of course.
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Old 11-12-2017, 07:48 PM
Quinntastic Quinntastic is offline
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Depends on the disc and or type of throw. If Im throwing a flip up distance shot my thumb is towards the rim. If I have something overstable, say my mf destroyer, I move my thumb further in the middle the more anhyzer I want respectively. Basically I think it helps force the disc on that plane and I feel I can really lay into it. But again this is only specific shots. Most of the time I have my thumb just on the inside rim.


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Old 11-13-2017, 11:14 AM
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Agree. But we were talking about generating spin so I went right to distance driving. Of course there are throws were you are trying to throw with the nose up so it makes sense to have varying thumb positions for certain types of shots.
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Old 11-14-2017, 10:50 AM
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I've recently started throwing with the deep thumb placement, where my thumb is flat and towards the center. Before I threw with my thumb bent and on the rim above my index finger. I had trouble controlling the shots at first, but I could see the potential so kept at it.

I am loving this grip for all hyzer release shots and it has increased my distance for these style shots, but I'm still having trouble flat and anhyzer releases. I find it's easier for me to control the angle of the disc, including nose angle (so less liklihood of a stall out) with my old grip on anhyzers.
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Old 11-14-2017, 04:25 PM
Nothaz Nothaz is offline
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Flat/hyzer/anhyzer

Discraft makes this easy with the ring
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  #18  
Old 11-15-2017, 12:03 AM
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Dan Ensor Dan Ensor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowplastic View Post
I completely agree with what you are saying. The thumb is necessary to maintain the nose down angle for my grip while throwing, but if I hold the disc out with a straight arm and wrist in proper position, and have zero pressure with the thumb or "hit" point of the throw pressure with my thumb, the disc angle doesn't really change. If I didn't grip with my thumb during the throw there would be problems of course.
My understanding is that without a slight pronation of the wrist ("forcing" the nose down), you can't get full extension.
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Old 11-15-2017, 11:18 AM
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Forcing the nose down, or keeping the nose down whichever, I found for me it's the most important thing to remember for consistent control and distance. In fact, since summer I've been doing every shot from a standstill. Once my grip and orientation to the target are established, the only thing I'm concentrating on is keeping the nose down.

I'm throwing farther and more accurately than I ever have, by quite a bit and my discs fly like they are supposed to more times than not. Runup? Meh. I'll start working in a couple steps next spring but for now my body is figuring out what a good shot feels like. I've put off rebuilding my throw for a long time because I thought it would be too hard to go back and start over. But it really isn't because if you concentrate on the right things you can do it without too much interruption to normal fun.
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  #20  
Old 11-18-2017, 11:31 PM
Grippenripp Grippenripp is offline
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I've heard a lot of different things about thumb placement, for me personally, keeping my thumb more on the rim/ right at the flight plate/rim junction helps me on turnovers and moving my thumb(just slightly) inward helps with me throwing hyzers you can take all the pro advice and clinic instruction in the world but I think the key is keeping good form in mind but I have to slightly tweak a lot of things to make them work for me. Do what feels best to you while keeping good, proper form in mind I feel that if you don't deviate from what is solid advice about biomechanics then you'll be okay, there are many different players, all with unique throwing styles all throwing nice shots consistently. That's my take
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