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Old 04-02-2009, 12:26 PM
hooboy hooboy is offline
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Default Long Turnover Throw

While watching the Atlanta Open last weekend at East Roswell Park, I saw the pros throwing long turnover shots (a must at that course from the back tees). The disc flies long and straight, and turns right (RHBH) late in its flight. I'm able to achieve this by throwing a Beast DX at a hyzer angle, with lots of tourque. It starts hyzer, flattens out, and then turns later than if I throw it flat. This disc has been one of my go-tos for anhyzer throws. I can't seem to achieve this flight yet with more stable discs. When I do it right, not only does it turn later in flight, but also flies longer period, than when I'm trying to throw flat. The danger for me is that without enough torque, it ends up as a weak hyzer.

Is this the right technique for these long turnover throws? Any advice on achieving this "pro-type" flight. Their throws were a thing of beauty on some of those holes. I'll take any advice. Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 04-02-2009, 12:41 PM
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trifocal trifocal is offline
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I'm maxing out 350 with the kind of throw you're describing. However I use a roadrunner...that tends to eliminate an early hyzer. There's a thread here somewhere that descibes OAT (off axis torque) and my understanding is that this OAT inhibits discs from doing what they are designed to do. The disc essentially wobbles and creates drag. The drag slows the disc and then proceeds to hyzer/fade. Developing form and a real smooth release is something we all are working on.

How far are you throwing?
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Old 04-02-2009, 01:03 PM
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trifocal trifocal is offline
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Also, the shot your describing....a disc nose down/hyzer release flying straight and 'suddenly' flipping to flat and then turning over and glidding is a bit different than an anhyzer.
The anhzer starts more flat ...and travels on a long C-shaped curve.

The discs can land in the same spot, but they take very different paths.
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Old 04-02-2009, 01:14 PM
garublador garublador is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trifocal View Post
There's a thread here somewhere that descibes OAT (off axis torque) and my understanding is that this OAT inhibits discs from doing what they are designed to do.
Actually, the most reliable way to get the shot he's describing (many times called a "roll curve") is to throw a disc that flips to flat and flies straight from a hyzer throw and purposely put some OAT on it to get it to turn over. You can control when and how much the disc turns over by varying the release angle and amount of OAT.

It's easiest to get these flights out of beat, stable fairway driver in low end plastics like a Gazelle, Eagle-X or Cyclone or if you want something that's easier from the start, a Cheetah, Polaris LS or Ace. The Teebird is actually not great for learning this stuff as it doesn't seem to like to turn gradually.

It's also an easy shot to do with a beat, stable mid or putter, but you won't be able to rely on the disc fading back like you can with a fairway driver.
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Old 04-02-2009, 01:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garublador View Post
Actually, the most reliable way to get the shot he's describing (many times called a "roll curve") is to throw a disc that flips to flat and flies straight from a hyzer throw and purposely put some OAT on it to get it to turn over. You can control when and how much the disc turns over by varying the release angle and amount of OAT.

It's easiest to get these flights out of beat, stable fairway driver in low end plastics like a Gazelle, Eagle-X or Cyclone or if you want something that's easier from the start, a Cheetah, Polaris LS or Ace. The Teebird is actually not great for learning this stuff as it doesn't seem to like to turn gradually.

It's also an easy shot to do with a beat, stable mid or putter, but you won't be able to rely on the disc fading back like you can with a fairway driver.

What he said.....ignore the trifocal behind the curtain. Thanks G.
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Old 04-02-2009, 06:01 PM
Omega SuperSloth Omega SuperSloth is offline
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i like the teebird for these shots started off with a little anny, a wraith works to but i prefer the teebird because i control it where the wraith will do the work for you.
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Old 04-03-2009, 12:05 PM
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progprowl progprowl is offline
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I just purchased a champion Beast a couple of months ago and have been enjoying this shot in my arsenal. I have noticed the drag that trifocal mentioned as well. How do I reduce my OAT and get some more distance while throwing the same sho?
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Old 04-03-2009, 12:54 PM
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EclipticOne EclipticOne is offline
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i like throwing that kinda shot when there is stuff on the left side of the course (rhbh). I use a pro starfire that is nice and beat in so its pretty flippy. On some holes when i put everything into it i can get my star destroyer to turn to the right a little but to the right before it comes back left.
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Old 04-03-2009, 01:03 PM
garublador garublador is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by progprowl View Post
How do I reduce my OAT and get some more distance while throwing the same sho?
One of the easiest way to help eliminate OAT is to practice throwing understable discs on hyzer lines.
Start short and work your way out.
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Old 04-05-2009, 02:05 AM
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I like throwing something a little stable on these lines, that way the disc will fight the anhyzer and stay straight a little longer before taking off to the right
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