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Old 08-22-2017, 12:52 PM
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Question Tee pad alternatives for dirt

It doesn't look like we will be able to pour concrete before the onset of the Seattle rain, so we're looking for temporary solutions for our natural (dirt) pads.

Rubber would be best, but we have no funds to purchase. Any ideas on where to get some for free?

Carpet was mentioned but that sounds as slippery as mud in constant precipitation. Anyone used it in wet conditions?

I'm thinking wood chips would probably be best for drainage, but are there other options I'm not considering?

As always, TIA.
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Old 08-22-2017, 01:25 PM
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Have you thought about contacting local stables and asking about old horse mats? They work pretty well and if they're older you could likely get em cheap. Personally I don't like wood chips over just bare ground, but if the alternative is mud... As for carpet, maybe turn the carpet upside down? Dunno how long it would hold up though.

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Old 08-22-2017, 02:11 PM
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Carpet actually works amazingly well, here's the thing though, flip it over and put the carpet side down and use the backing, grippy material as the tee. If you stake it down and prep well underneath you will be golden for a season or so. It does have to be replaced fairly often, but it's a great alternative when you are just trying to get through the wet season to pour your concrete. Something else would be pavers. Sometimes you can find them super cheap or even free on craigslist when people either pull them up or order too many for a job.

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Old 08-22-2017, 02:30 PM
biscoe biscoe is offline
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carpet is the way to go. berber- not anything taller. will work well for the duration you are looking for and should be able to source it for nothing.

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Old 08-22-2017, 03:04 PM
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I like the idea of the fault line and some of the benefits, but the only course I played with them, Credit Island, the fault line paint was like ice.
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:19 PM
curmudgeonDwindle curmudgeonDwindle is offline
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Although it might be cost prohibitive, I would look into a material called 'crusher run' (at least here in the southeast). It's like gravel but with a highly variable particle size ranging from 57-stone to dust. It compacts like a dream, it's easy to work, drains well and when time comes to pour will offer something of a reliable substrate for concrete. It will even suppress weeds...

for what it's worth...

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Old 08-22-2017, 04:07 PM
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OP:
Terry Calhoun has been experimenting with a 4 x 8 plywood and cement board sandwich design for his private course maybe contact him about that if you're curious.

https://www.discgolfscene.com/profile/1044

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Old 08-22-2017, 04:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadtripstuff View Post
Carpet actually works amazingly well, here's the thing though, flip it over and put the carpet side down and use the backing, grippy material as the tee. If you stake it down and prep well underneath you will be golden for a season or so. It does have to be replaced fairly often, but it's a great alternative when you are just trying to get through the wet season to pour your concrete. Something else would be pavers. Sometimes you can find them super cheap or even free on craigslist when people either pull them up or order too many for a job.
We've been using carpet for 12 years at Stoney Hill. Depending on where a tee is, they can last a long time. (But...we don't have much traffic. So I guess I should say they can survive the weather a long time).

We started with the upside-down method, and indeed it makes the tees very grippy. But we found that the South Carolina sun melted the backing, or something, because they started unravelling fairly quickly.

They remain amazing grippy when wet. The caveats are that if you have a place where mud washes into the carpet, it get slick---and in shade, some won't dry and will get mildew or something in the fibers, and get very slick.

With luck, you can find it for free, on the roadsides, or with connections with carpet installers, who need to do something with the old carpet they rip out.

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Old 08-22-2017, 04:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curmudgeonDwindle View Post
Although it might be cost prohibitive, I would look into a material called 'crusher run' (at least here in the southeast). It's like gravel but with a highly variable particle size ranging from 57-stone to dust. It compacts like a dream, it's easy to work, drains well and when time comes to pour will offer something of a reliable substrate for concrete. It will even suppress weeds...

for what it's worth...
We used to have a hole that teed off our driveway, which is crusher run. Not good---the larger pieces are like ball bearings, and not evenly-rolling ball bearings, at that.
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Old 08-22-2017, 04:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidSauls View Post
We used to have a hole that teed off our driveway, which is crusher run. Not good---the larger pieces are like ball bearings, and not evenly-rolling ball bearings, at that.
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