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Old 02-23-2018, 05:08 AM
dark_clark dark_clark is offline
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Default Precast Concrete Pads & Anchors







Norwalk Concrete Products recently posted this video.

I’d guess your local precast company could pull off forming up teepads. Cost, it’s an unknown to me at this point. Can’t imagine it’s inexpensive. . .
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Old 02-23-2018, 06:33 AM
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That's a nice service. Too bad disc golf is a niche market otherwise we might see this all over the place. I see they use a crane to set the pads. Hope they have something else to set pads in heavy woods like maybe a bobcat with a set of forks on it.
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Old 02-23-2018, 07:36 AM
Therealgoat Therealgoat is offline
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For the precaster, it would just be construction of the specific forms used for the tee pad, and it's probably a one-time cost for them. After that, mass/repeated production is easy for them. Throw in some lifting eyes to pick with and you're good to go.

Delivery is typically just like the pic shown above - the precaster will drive it to the location and unload it with their own truck. How you get it from unloading to final position, of course, is the harder part.

A large part of the cost would def. be renting the equipment required to move the pads as, like you mentioned, a lot of courses in the woods can't be driven to. A tracked skid steer with some loading forks could probably go just about anywhere (within reason), as long as you secure the load to the forks so it can't fall off. Be careful here folks, proper rigging saves lives, and you do not want even a small precast slab falling on you. Secure that load and watch for all possible pinch points.

My local course has poured some pads with their own forms near the parking lot and attempted to drag them out with a tractor slowly through heavy woods, but it's tough going and you always run the risk of cracking / damaging them during transit. They were successful, but it was a lot of effort.
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Old 02-23-2018, 10:38 AM
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Looks cool, but there was one thing that worried me a bit. I only have a small amount of experience installing courses, but wouldn't a precast anchor like the one in that video not be very secure? Normally, you dig a hole, put the basket/sleeve down in the hole, then pour the concrete in the hole so it forms snug to all the dirt surrounding it. If you put the precast anchor in, then fill the surrounding area with loose dirt, wouldn't the basket wobble around some? Maybe someone with more experience in the matter can chime in.
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Old 02-23-2018, 11:35 AM
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So the pad just sits on the crushed rock/limestone? What is to stop the pad from shifting over time?
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Old 02-23-2018, 12:09 PM
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Is the concrete reinforced with anything?
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Old 02-23-2018, 12:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knettles View Post
Looks cool, but there was one thing that worried me a bit. I only have a small amount of experience installing courses, but wouldn't a precast anchor like the one in that video not be very secure? Normally, you dig a hole, put the basket/sleeve down in the hole, then pour the concrete in the hole so it forms snug to all the dirt surrounding it. If you put the precast anchor in, then fill the surrounding area with loose dirt, wouldn't the basket wobble around some? Maybe someone with more experience in the matter can chime in.
\
Would depend on the ground its placed in. Clays and other soil types that compact well could hold it up well if properly compacted/tamped after placement. Rocky stuff like we have here , it would wobble like there is no tomorrow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BionicRib View Post
Is the concrete reinforced with anything?
There would just about have to be. Otherwise, they could not do a 4pt lift from the corners.

Quote:
Originally Posted by runningoz View Post
So the pad just sits on the crushed rock/limestone? What is to stop the pad from shifting over time?
If the ground is properly compacted or dug out and replaced with compacted base, it will be stable ...just as stable as if it were cast in place. Set on loose material, you will get some shifting, but probably not a whole lot. After the initial shift due to settling the loose material, the fill underneath will actually act as a shock absorber to mitigate ground movement. This method is used every day to set water tanks, etc..

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Old 02-23-2018, 02:05 PM
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Those pads must weigh 3,000+ lbs each. Can they be moved with a bobcat or farm tractor's front end loader?
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Old 02-23-2018, 02:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Doofenshmirtz View Post
Those pads must weigh 3,000+ lbs each. Can they be moved with a bobcat or farm tractor's front end loader?

Depends on the concrete material where they were cast....but they will be close to 3k give or take 500# or so.

Medium to larger Bobcats can move them easily. As long as they have at least a 2000# capacity, you will be good since their capacities are rated at 50% of their tipping load. If you know what you are doing, you can force a smaller machine to do it...but it will be a tippy ride and will risk breaking it if it slams the ground.

As to farm tractors, it will take a good sized one. Most farm loaders are add ons and not as strong lift wise as a skid steer. Just have to look at the rating.
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Old 02-23-2018, 05:09 PM
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seems like Pre cast will crack like crazy unless its got re bar running all through it. Pre cast will be flat on a not so flat surface. Its not like a car is going to be parked on the tee pad but pouring the concrete would probably last longer and not cost as much??
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