#91  
Old 09-15-2020, 01:32 PM
RoDeO RoDeO is offline
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Originally Posted by sidewinder22 View Post
That guy holds the distance record.

This guy ain't far behind.
And as I remember he aced that hole on that shot. His brace didn't do it's main job of keepung him from crashing out. Even though his brace gave out he still got hip rotation and distance. Interesting.
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  #92  
Old 09-15-2020, 01:37 PM
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sidewinder22 sidewinder22 is offline
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And as I remember he aced that hole on that shot. His brace didn't do it's main job of keepung him from crashing out. Even though his brace gave out he still got hip rotation and distance. Interesting.
Didn't slip until after release.
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  #93  
Old 09-15-2020, 01:41 PM
SaROCaM SaROCaM is offline
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And as I remember he aced that hole on that shot. His brace didn't do it's main job of keepung him from crashing out. Even though his brace gave out he still got hip rotation and distance. Interesting.
It is analysis like this, combined with things like not being able to throw an ultimate frisbee without major adjustments, that makes it clear you don't quite understand.

He was braced up through the release which is why he was able to throw the disc. The brace did its job up to that point. If he had no brace at all he would not have been able to throw.
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Old 09-15-2020, 02:01 PM
SaROCaM SaROCaM is offline
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I'm not sure what you mean by "beginner gains". What or where do you think my beginner gains will cease- what distance and why?
Going back to the idea that "everything works." There are many ways to throw a disc 100 feet. You can do a lot of things "wrong" and throw a disc 100 feet. Same thing with 200 feet, 250 feet, 300 feet, 350 feet. Eventually you get to a point where you reach the limit of what you can do with a given technique.

Look at your own progression. You started around 200 feet, then 250, then 275, and so on. Relatively big jumps in relatively short amounts of time. Now you are at 375 where a little over a month ago you were at 370. The increases are getting smaller and taking longer to get. Maybe next month you will get to 380. Then maybe the month after that you will get to 383. Then two months after that you get to 385. Then six months later you get to 388. Then a year later you get to 390. Don't get caught up in these numbers; they are there to illustrate the concept. Unless your form is very close to optimal, if you keep the same form, you will get closer and closer to the limit of your current form. You can rotate faster and faster with your current form, but there will be diminishing returns. This is why people reach a plateau.

To progress in distance past that limit, you will have to make changes to your current form. Once you reach the limit of that new form, you will have to make changes again. With each iteration, you will get closer and closer to the "ideal" form (there will be individual differences, but the important parts will be the same.)

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Old 09-15-2020, 02:14 PM
RoDeO RoDeO is offline
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Originally Posted by SaROCaM View Post
Going back to the idea that "everything works." There are many ways to throw a disc 100 feet. You can do a lot of things "wrong" and throw a disc 100 feet. Same thing with 200 feet, 250 feet, 300 feet, 350 feet. Eventually you get to a point where you reach the limit of what you can do with a given technique.

Look at your own progression. You started around 200 feet, then 250, then 275, and so on. Relatively big jumps in relatively short amounts of time. Now you are at 375 where a little over a month ago you were at 370. The increases are getting smaller and taking longer to get. Maybe next month you will get to 380. Then maybe the month after that you will get to 383. Then two months after that you get to 385. Then six months later you get to 388. Then a year later you get to 390. Don't get caught up in these numbers; they are there to illustrate the concept. Unless your form is very close to optimal, if you keep the same form, you will get closer and closer to the limit of your current form. You can rotate faster and faster with your current form, but there will be diminishing returns. This is why people reach a plateau.

To progress in distance past that limit, you will have to make changes to your current form. Once you reach the limit of that new form, you will have to make changes again. With each iteration, you will get closer and closer to the "ideal" form (there will be individual differences, but the important parts will be the same.)
I do believe we keep making fine adjustments as we progress. These work along with faster muscle firings. It goes back to what contributes more to distance gains- gaining the correct muscle groups or mechanics. I'm betting its more about the muscles firing more efficiently, faster and more powerfully.
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Old 09-15-2020, 02:39 PM
SaROCaM SaROCaM is offline
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I do believe we keep making fine adjustments as we progress. These work along with faster muscle firings. It goes back to what contributes more to distance gains- gaining the correct muscle groups or mechanics. I'm betting its more about the muscles firing more efficiently, faster and more powerfully.
So in running from a Point A to a Point B, you would choose running faster in a curved line over running in a straight line?

If you were on a football field, in a race to run from goalpost to goalpost, you would choose to run faster around the perimeter of the field rather than straight up the middle?
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Old 09-15-2020, 03:18 PM
RoDeO RoDeO is offline
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So in running from a Point A to a Point B, you would choose running faster in a curved line over running in a straight line?

If you were on a football field, in a race to run from goalpost to goalpost, you would choose to run faster around the perimeter of the field rather than straight up the middle?
No. Im just goung off my own experience. I feel like my mechanics are decent for where I'm at right now. Sure, they are going to be tweaked as I progress but I have seen my biggest gains from actively working on my responsiveness. I look at the pros and every single one of them all share that one thing in common- they are very explosive in their release on distance drives. They rotate and explode into release very fast.
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Old 09-15-2020, 07:01 PM
SaROCaM SaROCaM is offline
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Looking at pros throw in slow motion they all begin hip rotation before front foot contact and that hip turn remains constant as the weight shifts from rear to front leg.
Nope:



Linear first into rotation, just like she describes in her own words.

Also:

Biomechanical analysis of MLB pitchers throwing an average of 95 MPH showed the lower body sequence as: Loading, then Striding, then Rotation.

Notice how Rotation was not first in the sequence, and came after Striding.
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Old 09-15-2020, 07:11 PM
RoDeO RoDeO is offline
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Nope:



Linear first into rotation, just like she describes in her own words.

Also:

Biomechanical analysis of MLB pitchers throwing an average of 95 MPH showed the lower body sequence as: Loading, then Striding, then Rotation.

Notice how Rotation was not first in the sequence, and came after Striding.
That video is a standstill throw at lower power.

In baseball the rotation happens before front foot plant. That was my point.
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  #100  
Old 09-15-2020, 07:35 PM
SaROCaM SaROCaM is offline
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That video is a standstill throw at lower power.
Standstill is the basis of the throw. Many find they throw about 80% of their full distance from a standstill.

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In baseball the rotation happens before front foot plant. That was my point.
Do you still think the first move is rotational in nature, or linear? (not purely, but in terms of intent?)
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