#41  
Old 01-17-2019, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by davetherocketguy View Post
Depends on your definition of level. I'm kinda partial to flat and level regardless of material used. So yeah, IMHO you will almost always need to do some amount of leveling. If there is a high point right where you want to place one of these this SOB may teeter-totter on that point as you do your run-up.

Pavers can be a good surface provided those installing them take great care to do it right and they are maintained properly. But that usually doesn't happen so in general pavers suck.
With pavers you need to use a plate compactor and lay the pavers, then brush sand in it often to fill in the little cracks. This will keep the pieces from sliding around. I personally like pavers because when a teepad is getting wore out you do not have to replace the whole tee, but just the few pavers that have worn slick. We are having this problem now on one of our local courses, the course is 30+ years old and the pads are done for, if it was pavers it would take 20-30 bucks to fix, but now its going to be in the 1000s to tear them up and replace.
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  #42  
Old 01-17-2019, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Future_Primitive View Post
I am going to have to disagree with this as I witnessed one break at Terry's house not long after install. One of the pads was placed on a slightly uneven ground and during a round it broke on somebody's run up. Kind of snapped in half, still usable but definitely noticeable. It may not need to be perfect leveling but you still need to do a decent job of leveling or risk snapping these on uneven ground.

(Was long par 4 or 5 hole near edge of property, long hole with mando at BRATS)
This is true, I was mainly talking about the amount of leveling that is required for pavers is 10x the amount for these.

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  #43  
Old 01-17-2019, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by RootsDiscGolf View Post
With pavers you need to use a plate compactor and lay the pavers, then brush sand in it often to fill in the little cracks. This will keep the pieces from sliding around. I personally like pavers because when a teepad is getting wore out you do not have to replace the whole tee, but just the few pavers that have worn slick. We are having this problem now on one of our local courses, the course is 30+ years old and the pads are done for, if it was pavers it would take 20-30 bucks to fix, but now its going to be in the 1000s to tear them up and replace.
Sounds like you're one of the few that knows how to install them correctly.
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  #44  
Old 01-17-2019, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by davetherocketguy View Post
Sounds like you're one of the few that knows how to install them correctly.
Thank you, I think they look nice also. What is really cool is you can take donations for the pads and have a paver engraved with their name or something like that. I want to do this for a course in the future. We will see if anybody else thinks its a good idea.

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  #45  
Old 01-18-2019, 08:53 PM
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Originally Posted by RootsDiscGolf View Post
With pavers you need to use a plate compactor and lay the pavers, then brush sand in it often to fill in the little cracks. This will keep the pieces from sliding around. I personally like pavers because when a teepad is getting wore out you do not have to replace the whole tee, but just the few pavers that have worn slick. We are having this problem now on one of our local courses, the course is 30+ years old and the pads are done for, if it was pavers it would take 20-30 bucks to fix, but now its going to be in the 1000s to tear them up and replace.
There's got to be a way to roughen up the surface that will cost less than tearing them out and pouring new concrete.

The pic below is from the Channahon, IL course. The diagonal grooves in the tee help traction in slippery conditions. They've been that way since I've been playing the course and I couldn't tell you if the grooves were done while the concrete was drying or were cut at some point after the concrete had cured. I'm not saying renting a concrete saw for long enough to cut grooves like that would be practical, but there are ways to improve grip.



If the tees are cracked that's another story, but if they are in otherwise good shape you should be able to made them sufficiently grippy again.

Last edited by Countchunkula; 01-18-2019 at 08:56 PM.
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