#71  
Old 09-28-2017, 12:06 PM
slowplastic slowplastic is offline
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Originally Posted by TripleB View Post
Don't have but a second, will respond more later, but does the weight of the disc matter when trying to learn this shot with the Stingray/Comet/etc? ie: is it easier to try and learn this shot with a 155g disc compared to a 170g disc, or vice versa?

Thanks!!!

TripleB
Not inherently...it depends again on that particular disc for if it is more/less stable than the 170g. It all has to due with wing shape. All things being equal, two discs same mold and exactly same wing height, the lighter one would be easier.

I believe you bought a Swan putter? I have not thrown the newer Swan 1 Reborn, just a Swan 2 I think...but it was perfect for this shot for me...I was using it 250-280' for reference and only threw it a couple times. It would fly the line that Ricky threw in that video for me, I'm sure at lower distances too. If this Swan is like the one I threw, then it would be a great disc for learning this shot with.

Remember though this is a more advanced shot that has to be practiced. You need to be able to throw flat shots with barely any fade, and hyzer release shots that flip to straight. Then you kind of combine those two shots without "telling" the disc to go right...you have to trust that it will do the shot and not yank on it, or else it will hit the ground on edge badly.
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  #72  
Old 09-28-2017, 12:18 PM
slowplastic slowplastic is offline
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Originally Posted by august dupree View Post
Likewise, a slower speed disc also has a lower "stall speed", which you can think of is the point where the disc begins to fade. A slower speed disc will generally carry further than a faster disc (if thrown with the exact same amount of power) before it fades because the point where it starts to fade is later due to its lower stall speed.
I agree with everything you've said, except a slight part of this sentence. I would say that a lower speed disc carries "later into its flight" before fading than a higher speed disc.

High speed discs don't fly faster, which is just worth stating...they maintain their speed better since they are more aerodynamic. So if thrown with the same velocity, at 280' the mid might start fading softly while the speed 12 disc is still ripping at its cruising speed and hasn't given up as much velocity to friction. But when the high speed disc drops in velocity a bit, the fade will kick in much sooner relative to its flight path and initial release velocity. This is all from experience and throwing a ton of discs/shots, I have not measured this exactly.

I have not thrown a Stingray but from its numbers and your recommendation I'd say that's a better option than a Comet for a new player then. Some Comets can be very straight. However, I still suggest practicing with the Swan if TripleB has one, as that should be a good starting point.

Also, august dupree is doing a good job explaining anhyzer/turnover whereas I'm just speaking about turnover shots since those are the flight paths in the video clip. Both shots are very useful to know. They can achieve similar flight paths but the release angle, technique, and disc choice is quite different.

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  #73  
Old 09-28-2017, 12:28 PM
deyo7 deyo7 is offline
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Just some added two cents. Plastic type might also matter in the weight decision.

For example if DX, I think you'd be better served learning that anhyzer shot with a 170g. I think it will be easier to translate to other discs because in order to execute this shot you need to focus on having consistent anhyzer release and followthrough angle. I had a 155g dx leopard that I used as a beginner and, at least for me, once it beat in a little bit, if I threw on anhyzer it was too squirrely and would likely be a roller. So in order to get it to turn right I would throw it flat and followthrough flat or through harder on hyzer once really beat in. At the end of the day this didn't help me learn anhyzer, only helped with learning to control hyzerflips. I'm betting you'll get longer use out of 170gram and be able to train more properly.

All that said, I would follow slowplastics advice above and try it out with your swan putter.

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Last edited by deyo7; 09-28-2017 at 12:31 PM.
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  #74  
Old 09-28-2017, 12:40 PM
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Kodachrome Kodachrome is offline
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Originally Posted by TripleB View Post
If you've read my other two post you know I'm a 50 year old newbie to disc golf who has been trying to put my first 5 disc into my bag. So far I have a Leopard DX 167g, a Shark DX 173g, and a Aviar P&A 175g. It looks as though I'll be adding a GStar TeeBird 168g and either another Aviar P&A designated for short/accurate drives or maybe a Colt for same reason.

As I lay awake this morning I thought of situation that may be different for me than most other disc golf players....or maybe not.

I haven't watched but a few hours of competition disc golf but it seems like (from what I remember) players throw their backhand and their forehand with same hand.

For me I'll be throwing my backhand right handed and my forehand left handed. I'm sure I could throw my forehand right handed if in a bad spot on the course but since I throw a baseball left handed that will be the way I typically throw my forehand.

Right now I'm not overly concerned with forehand throws, mainly trying to get a consistent backhand, but I'm sure it won't be long until I find myself in a situation where a forehand would be the obvious (or maybe not so obvious for a newbie) shot choice.

So, my questions are these:

1) How will throwing my backhand with one hand and my forehand with my opposite hand affect my disc choices?

2) Once I get to the point of looking to purchase a disc specifically for my forehand, what should I be looking for in a disc? ie: model of Innova disc? what weight? what type of high speed stability score? low stability score?

Thanks again for everyone's help!!!

TripleB
I have the same issues. Sucks.

Throwing forehand is easier to dial in soft anhyzer shots, which is nice.

Learn to throw little forehand rollers to compensate for your lack of forehand where ever possible. Think of throwing the disc like a baseball, overhand, into the ground in front of you on edge. Forehand is better for short distance since you have great control. Backhand is for big rollers imo.

You will want more overstable discs throwing forehand, typically, but I would learn the basics with neutral discs if possible. If your goal is just to have fun and not cultivate skill to compete, then who cares. Throw a meathook in the bag and call it good for your fh if that's you. Also work on your backhand hyzerflip-to-late-turnover shots and anhyzers.

I've learned to throw a lot more overhand (thumber and tomahawk) as well as roller shots to work around the shortcomings to a degree. On the bright side, it's usually easier for us to get around trees.

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Last edited by Kodachrome; 09-28-2017 at 12:43 PM.
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  #75  
Old 09-28-2017, 01:03 PM
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TripleB TripleB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowplastic View Post
Obviously they can only print a set of numbers for a typical or expected throw, so you have to see how the disc works at your arm speed. Also, as rims get wider...as in going to a higher speed rated disc, the disc will tend to want to fade as it slows down more noticeably. So the Leo is a slow fairway driver, and will inherently want to fade as it slows down if it has enough time. But if it is thrown hard enough and low enough it will drift right continually for a RHBH throw. A neutral/understable putter or mid will inherently fade less as it slows down, and a high speed driver will fade more noticeably.

I have not thrown a Stingray, but a combination of it being slower speed and understable makes it a good candidate for right-finishing shots. Other options are the Comet, and beat in or understable putters. See my post above and rewatch the video thinking about how I describe the differences of the putter/mid/fairway being thrown.
I was watching a video last night of Johansen and Sexton playing a round at a course in my hometown and was thinking the same thing...my arm speed is nowhere close to what there's are, not sure how I'm going to get the disc as far as they do on these holes I'll be playing Saturday. Finally decided it will just take me an extra shot.

Will rewatch that video tonight.

Thank you for your help!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by SaROCaM View Post
Throw that DX Leopard enough and it will get beat up into that kind of disc, especially if you can throw it at least 250'-270' or so. If it is your primary driver and you play regularly, it shouldn't take very long.
Watched a video of pros playing a course I'll be playing on Saturday...with all the trees and roots I saw I'm sure that Leopard will be pretty beat up by the end of a couple rounds. Haven't really measure how far I throw the Leopard but will get a chance to do so this afternoon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tu-f-o View Post
imo, it doesn't matter what disc in the beginning, but once you get good, it DOES matter what disc.
So it's going to be a while In all seriousness I've been out practicing consistent throws, not I just have to start adding a little more arm speed to my throws. Luckily I love practicing so hopefully learning will happen at a nice steady pace!

Quote:
Originally Posted by august dupree View Post
The turning anyhzer shot is MUCH easier for a beginner to learn with a slower understable disc like a Stingray in my opinion. It allows you to slow down and really feel what it takes to make the disc hold that turn and gliiiiide around to the right.

Don't think the Stingray is just for beginners either. You'd be surprised how straight and far you can throw it on a hyzerflip. But really, it's about learning the controlled anyhzer shot. You need this technique to get good at disc golf. It would not hurt you to throw a Dx Stingray at around 170g in your bag. It's essential that you learn this shot eventually. Sure you can do it with your Leopard too but I'm not really talking about off the tee. I'm talking about when your out on the hole somewhere and you have that 150 foot shot that you need to turn to the right and that's your only option.

Good luck!
Thank you very much for the explanation concerning slower disc vs. faster disc.

The Stingray (or something similar) definitely sounds like a disc I'll need soon. As mentioned above, I watched some pros play my hometown course and was trying to pay attention to what type of throw was needed for each shot and there seemed like quite a few where a throw shaped to the right was needed. OK...so a true midrange disc. Got it!

Thanks for the advice!!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by slowplastic View Post
Two discs same mold and exactly same wing height, the lighter one would be easier.

I believe you bought a Swan putter? I have not thrown the newer Swan 1 Reborn, just a Swan 2 I think...but it was perfect for this shot for me...I was using it 250-280' for reference and only threw it a couple times. It would fly the line that Ricky threw in that video for me, I'm sure at lower distances too. If this Swan is like the one I threw, then it would be a great disc for learning this shot with.

Remember though this is a more advanced shot that has to be practiced. You need to be able to throw flat shots with barely any fade, and hyzer release shots that flip to straight. Then you kind of combine those two shots without "telling" the disc to go right...you have to trust that it will do the shot and not yank on it, or else it will hit the ground on edge badly.
Thanks for that info. I guess one of the things I'm worried about right now is my arm speed being so slow...I'm sure it will get stronger but right now it's pretty slow as I'm just starting out and I'm trying to get my form to be consistent.

Great to hear about the Swan...yes, should be sitting on my front porch when I get home this afternoon. I think they show the Swan 1 RB to be even a little more understable than the Swan 2 so hopefully that will work out well.

I definitely want to work on getting my form down and my arm speed up, then will start working on this shot that will allow me to reach the right side when needed.

Thanks to everyone for your input, help and patience!!!

TripleB




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