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Old 07-08-2011, 01:42 PM
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Default Who uses a forward swing?

I have noticed from watching videos and from my own throws, that a lot of players will extend their throwing arm forward as they go into their x-step. How many people have noticed this is their own throws? What do u think the benefits (if any) from this? A good example of a pro who does this is Dave Feldberg. Could this be considered a part of the Sweedish technique? In playing around with it a bit, I noticed when I consciously do this, I tend to get better extension on the backswing. You just have to turn the shoulders and you're in position for your pull. The first few times I tried it, I did get off balance and some terrible throws as a result (pulled them 'over the top' to the right). But when I concentrated on staying more neutral and centered, Ihad better results. I had one really good shot that even though it didn't go much longer, it felt really effortless in the delivery.

Appreciate any responses. If I respond back right away, it's because the internet's down at the house and I'm on the library computer.
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Old 07-08-2011, 02:31 PM
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Ryan P. Ryan P. is offline
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I do it, and people say I look like a professional when I do it. It was never intended or thought out at all, I just do it sometimes, and not even all the time.

After thinking about it, I think that it helps keep the arm loose and flexible, ready to launch that disc. I've seen people who just run up with the disc as far back as it can go already (their right hand is behind their left hip throughout their run-up). I think this makes some people tight and robs them of their distance.
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Old 07-08-2011, 02:32 PM
garublador garublador is offline
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I can see how it would be used to "prime" your arm and wrist, too. You do a quick little pump to get all of your joints and levers aligned how you want and then keep that alignment throughout the throw.
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Old 07-08-2011, 02:42 PM
biodarwin biodarwin is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garublador View Post
I can see how it would be used to "prime" your arm and wrist,
Can you elaborate on this more? I don't understand how this can "prime" your arm and wrist.

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Originally Posted by garublador View Post
too. You do a quick little pump to get all of your joints and levers aligned how you want and then keep that alignment throughout the throw.
So your saying its easier to get in alignment by making unnecessary movements in your throw?
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Old 07-08-2011, 02:59 PM
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I do it almost as a double check to get my mind focusing on where I need to throw. Im still learning this whole proper form and back hand throw thing lol
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Old 07-08-2011, 03:06 PM
garublador garublador is offline
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Originally Posted by biodarwin View Post
Can you elaborate on this more? I don't understand how this can "prime" your arm and wrist.
By "prime" I mean that I can see how you can use that pump to "set" parts of your arm in the position you want it to be in before you start your pull. Any of those parts that don't need to be moved during the reach back or pull can be left stationary. I can see how it could be easier to get lined up that way.



Quote:
So your saying its easier to get in alignment by making unnecessary movements in your throw?
It's not really unnecessary if it's making getting lined up easier, now is it? It's also before any of the important upper body or arm mechanics happen, so all you have to do is be able to do it during the least important part of your footwork, which not everyone will find easy to do right away.
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Old 07-08-2011, 03:28 PM
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Since so much of the throw (like most athletic moves) is about timing and sequence, I think most do it as a way of maintaining a rhythm. If you don't reach back until you've taken a step or two of your x-step, then while your body is going through those steps, it's not really natural for your upper body to be static. So, in my opinion, it's all about rhythm and sequence.
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Old 07-08-2011, 03:58 PM
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I've heard it referred to as "pointing". Whenever I do a run-up, I do it with my elbow or I'll feign a throw as I'm going into the run-up. I agree that it helps with a sense of rhythm, but I don't know if it's a necessity or if it's all that helpful.
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Old 07-08-2011, 04:14 PM
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I do it. When I "retooled" my throw, I intentionally copied Dave Feldberg"s style. The rhythm and routine added consistency to my drives. I drive more accurate and can replicate my throws now. It makes course management easier.

By using the routine, I always turn my hips and have good extension on my reach back.

I use a mini, slow motion swing on long putts too. It has really helped.
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Old 07-08-2011, 04:23 PM
BradC BradC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eegor View Post
I do it. When I "retooled" my throw, I intentionally copied Dave Feldberg"s style. The rhythm and routine added consistency to my drives. I drive more accurate and can replicate my throws now. It makes course management easier.

By using the routine, I always turn my hips and have good extension on my reach back.
Same here. I find it delays the rest of my throw, in a good way. When I do it this way, my pull doesn't start until after my front foot is down and weight has shifted.

If I don't do it, I feel like I rush my pull.
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