[Other] Having few molds vs. having many

This conversation is still going on, huh?
I just stopped by to see if you guys got it figured out yet.
No, ok, carry on walking in circles... One side is bound to break sooner or later...

Hey, it could happen. I just got my first Groove...maybe I'll cycle that and trigger a different segment of the DGCR population.
 
It's not nonsense. The back seat, next to me in the front (66' with bench seats, so it's door to door, then door to my ass), and nearly every inch of floorboard, is occupied by seasoned discs. I use these for form practice, so I do know what a beat to hell disc flies like.

I'm glad you have a spiritual connection with your Rocs...but that isn't an argument against my comment. There's a brand new disc out there that can cover the lines of a seasoned Roc. If grip isn't an issue and if one was satisfied with the glide when fresh, an increase in those aren't necessary positives.

I enjoy a blustery tirade as much as the next unintelligent, misinformed, guy who crossed your path on the internet, but you're kinda sounding one note.
It old school/new school.

Back in the day, disc golfers were a very diverse group: Old, young, hippies, rednecks, white collar, blue collar, unemployed degenerates...all brought together by one common unifying trait: we were cheap. :|

So the old school response to this post is WHY IN THE HELL WOULD I BUY A NEW DISC IF I ALREADY HAVE A BEAT DISC THAT DOES THAT!?!?! It defies old school disc golf in every sense of it's being to the point of being offensive to my clearly-defined cheap soul and makes me want to Red Foreman plant my foot upside your ***. It's kinda a visceral thing.

But hey...if you crazy kids want to search for discs that fly like old discs you already have so you can spend more money, knock yourself out.

Where I see it in practice is new players think base plastic is a joke and won't throw it. An old-school guy with a Z Buzzz that is not breaking in quickly would buy a Pro D Buzzz and pair those until the Z Buzzz seasons. The Pro D is cheap and will break in quickly to fill that slot, no problem. One mold. The new players wouldn't touch Pro D with a ten foot pole so they buy a Golf Line Fuse or an ESP Meteor and throw two molds. They spend more money that way, which is why I don't do it.
 
You don't need to cycle Grooves. Pick up three. They all fly different lines.

None fly seasoned Roc lines.
 
I intimately know how a flat top Zone behaves. Not the ones in my possession. The mold, as a whole. No field time required.

I'm still trying to figure out why you think I keep saying you're wrong about something. How you approach your game is the correct way, and how I approach my game is also correct.

Sure, a beat roc flies different from a new roc. A new zone flies like a new zone, and a new roc flies like a new roc, obviously. The only preference I have is that I don't like premium plastic for anything that isn't a driver (and even prefer dx eagles still) and build my bag and game based off of that.
 
Yeah the only reason I buy multiples is for if I lose a disc I use.
Even then it won't fly exactly the same.
 
I think this is all more of a commie/socialist vs democratic/capitalist argument. All these new kids to the block, throwing their commie made plastic, feel that the division of labor is a must. No way you can throw the same mold for different lines, that would mean that some other disc won’t be bringing home their allotted potatoes and that means no vodka.

The OG capitalist frolfers, on the other hand, would prefer to reward their seasoned discs for the hard work they’ve put in over the course of the being bagged. The disc has earned its right to keep flying as its proven useful and successful at many different lines.

To use another analogy, the commies are all asking, “Why does the rat want to be a chef?!? The rats role in the world is to be vermin, so no matter what life experience they’ve had that has prepared them to move outside the traditional “rat role” and evolve, they can go f*ck themselves if they think they’re gonna get my (insert crappy commie mold name here)’s potatoes...”

Which line of thought is correct? Ask East Berlin.
 
New Old Guy Perspective

This has been an interesting thread and I have enjoyed it more than most.

My take, as a 58 yo new guy, is that my primary requirement for a mold is consistency. If I lose my Proton Alias in the morning, I want to be able to replace it with new one that flies almost exactly the same out of the box that afternoon.

I simply don't have the time to season discs as some do and I like to keep the bag small and compact, so my preference is a mold that just stays the same over time and can be easily replaced, if needed. That way I can reasonably assume that it is the archer, not the arrow.

Simple works for me.
 
I think this is all more of a commie/socialist vs democratic/capitalist argument. All these new kids to the block, throwing their commie made plastic, feel that the division of labor is a must. No way you can throw the same mold for different lines, that would mean that some other disc won’t be bringing home their allotted potatoes and that means no vodka.

The OG capitalist frolfers, on the other hand, would prefer to reward their seasoned discs for the hard work they’ve put in over the course of the being bagged. The disc has earned its right to keep flying as its proven useful and successful at many different lines.

To use another analogy, the commies are all asking, “Why does the rat want to be a chef?!? The rats role in the world is to be vermin, so no matter what life experience they’ve had that has prepared them to move outside the traditional “rat role” and evolve, they can go f*ck themselves if they think they’re gonna get my (insert crappy commie mold name here)’s potatoes...”

Which line of thought is correct? Ask East Berlin.

Division of labor is a capitalist thing...but I agree with your "buy local" sentiment.

"In communist society, where nobody has one exclusive sphere of activity but each can become accomplished in any branch he wishes, society regulates the general production and thus makes it possible for me to do one thing today and another tomorrow, to hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticise after dinner, just as I have a mind, without ever becoming hunter, fisherman, herdsman or critic." - Marx
 
Sure, sure, just having some fun. You should try fun sometime, digging your heals in so hard to an online frisbee debate can’t be good for your heart.
 
Sure, sure, just having some fun. You should try fun sometime, digging your heals in so hard to an online frisbee debate can’t be good for your heart.

Actually, studies show that a fitness regime of arguing online and digging in your heels can improve heart health over the long term.

The key is to avoid over-training. When used sparingly, online argument can be a safe everyday exercise. However, you don't want to dig in your heels more than every other day. Heel digging can lead to tendonitis if you don't allow proper rest. It also increases risk of developing The Gout.
 
...and if ya gets teh Gout, your game is gonna suck no matter how many/few molds you carry. : oldmansmiley:
 
Remember the old Steven Wright joke, "My socks DO match. They're the same thickness."?

This sort of describes me when I choose discs. I won't want to throw a GStar Teebird along with my Star Teebirds, because GStar does not feel the same to me. And, K3 Kaxes do not feel the same as K1 Kaxes do, in my opinion.

Much of the time, if given a choice of throwing the same mold in different plastics or throwing different molds in the same plastic, I will choose to go with multiple molds in the same plastic. And, the plastic does not necessarily have to be exactly the same for all the molds. There can be multiple plastics; but they should feel the same. There is a tactile sensation from each plastic. For some reason it is important to me that every fairway driver have the same grip in my hand. It's okay if one of the discs has a somewhat larger wing than the others, as long as it grips the same as the others.

So, when someone would say that Philo sometimes uses Champion Rocs, I would think, "Oh, but those are nothing like DX Rocs. It won't feel the same."

I think that a person who loves some particular plastic might be inclined, as I am, to use discs that have the same feel as that plastic. And, newer players like me who have had premium plastic available from day one, while perhaps having less experience with base plastics, may not be inclined to try many base plastic models because these are not what we learned on. The base plastic doesn't feel the same. And, as others have stated, those who use premium plastic are probably more inclined to use a greater number of molds due to the difficulty of beating in premium plastic.
 
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Remember the old Steven Wright joke, "My socks DO match. They're the same thickness."?

This sort of describes me when I choose discs. I won't want to throw a GStar Teebird along with my Star Teebirds, because GStar does not feel the same to me. And, K3 Kaxes do not feel the same as K1 Kaxes do, in my opinion.

Much of the time, if given a choice of throwing the same mold in different plastics or throwing different molds in the same plastic, I will choose to go with multiple molds in the same plastic. And, the plastic does not necessarily have to be exactly the same for all the molds. There can be multiple plastics; but they should feel the same. There is a tactile sensation from each plastic. For some reason it is important to me that every fairway driver have the same grip in my hand. It's okay if one of the discs has a somewhat larger wing than the others, as long as it grips the same as the others.

So, when someone would say that Philo sometimes uses Champion Rocs, I would think, "Oh, but those are nothing like DX Rocs. It won't feel the same."

I think that a person who loves some particular plastic might be inclined, as I am, to use discs that have the same feel as that plastic. And, newer players like me who have had premium plastic available from day one, while perhaps having less experience with base plastics, may not be inclined to try many base plastic models because these are not what we learned on. The base plastic doesn't feel the same. And, as others have stated, those who use premium plastic are probably more inclined to use a greater number of molds due to the difficulty of beating in premium plastic.

Philo uses one Champ Rancho Roc. Just one. As a utility overstable mid/approach disc.
 
Necro bump:

For the old DGR heads, Blake (from what Dan Beto said) put 8 as the max molds one should use.

Personally, I think 10 is the max one should use, and this includes speciality/utility discs. There might be some overlap with other discs, but they serve a purpose.

I think the centerpiece to each speed category should be based around a stable disc. Once the stable disc is settled up on, match accordingly to preference.

For example, here's my setup:

Distance:
Stable- Wraith or Trace (thinking about going back to Wraith)
Understable- Tern

Fairway:
Stable- Vulture
Understable- Drift

Mids:
Overstable- TBD
Stable to understable- Squall

Putter:
Overstable- Zone
Stable- Pilot

Utility:
Fireball

9 molds

I find this setup a balance between the two views. It's not too crazy with the molds, each mold can be learned and thrown on different angles creating less confusion, they can be easily replaced if lost, you have a particular shot if needed without having to go through cycling, and the stages of wear might have greater separation due to their stabilities.
 
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