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Pete's crushing things, roller stuff

Sheep

Sir, This is a Wendy's
Joined
Jul 27, 2017
Messages
1,383



I don't think he 100% nailed all of it. And might have overcomplicated some of it. But it's really good info.

It's just .. a bit harder to work with the idea of lift and pressures when were talking about a disc rolling at 20-30mph when its designed to fly at 60.

And we know that discs roll based on their parting line, which indicates to me some of the info he's talking about with precession, but more on the case of gravity with those forces resisting.

Cause otherwise, the info he's providing on some rollers and hitting at these really weird angles, uhh. I'd be such a roller king ya'll call me King Roller Kong or something.
Cause when I throw that stupid flippy roller disc I play with and i don't get it up and over enough, it cut rolls, it doesn't do what he says.

However, I did learn from this. I have a really weird issue when I throw rollers that I couldn't figure out that he got me that ahh ha moment here.

So I'll throw a backhand turnover roller. And I'll have the disc flip to the right and land lets say at a 45° angle. That disc will hit, then imediately make a left hand turn about 15-25 degree's and then start its rolling cycle. This is SUPER annoying when you drop it perfect and it does this weird characteristic.

So its the spin with the off axis torque created as the disc goes from a spinning flight, to synchronizing with the ground to roll.

So, I'd guess my spin is out speeding my flight, or visa versa, which causes the disc to gain off axis torque, and with precession, that causes the disc to turn.

It's kind of a pain in the ass, cause its so random when it does it. but it's usually when I'm trying to throw distance rollers vs control rollers.
 
And we know that discs roll based on their parting line, which indicates to me some of the info he's talking about with precession, but more on the case of gravity with those forces resisting.

Yeah, this is what stuck out to me in his explanation as well. He's trying to explain everything in purely rotation based mechanics, whereas the ground reaction will also want to steer the disc similar to someone on a skate.

I'm also puzzled by his perception / intent when he says overstable discs don't have lift... Seemed like he said it to moreso make a pure rotation view point consistent with observed behaviour.
 
Yeah, this is what stuck out to me in his explanation as well. He's trying to explain everything in purely rotation based mechanics, whereas the ground reaction will also want to steer the disc similar to someone on a skate.

I'm also puzzled by his perception / intent when he says overstable discs don't have lift... Seemed like he said it to moreso make a pure rotation view point consistent with observed behaviour.

I think he's nailing some of the basics on one side of the coin, but not capturing the other side. If that makes sense.

Because when it comes to rollers as well, we know a disc will generally roll like it flies. Part of that is purely based on the parting line height changing the ground to gravity forces. And a whole lot of the rest of it is technique, spin and some other random factors.

I throw lots of rollers and it's a really complicated subject, because sometimes rollers do things you dont expect them to do at all and it makes no sense, while other rollers I can look at a disc and tell you exactly how its going to roll depending on how you throw it.
 
I think he's nailing some of the basics on one side of the coin, but not capturing the other side. If that makes sense.

Because when it comes to rollers as well, we know a disc will generally roll like it flies. Part of that is purely based on the parting line height changing the ground to gravity forces. And a whole lot of the rest of it is technique, spin and some other random factors.

I throw lots of rollers and it's a really complicated subject, because sometimes rollers do things you dont expect them to do at all and it makes no sense, while other rollers I can look at a disc and tell you exactly how its going to roll depending on how you throw it.

For sure, I'm not trying to throw the baby out with the bath water so to speak.

I think the ground action and it impacting spin was a particular interesting point I hadn't given real thought to before. Probably a fair bit of variability in there depending on surface conditions (i.e. friction interplay with how much the disc catches etc), and how bouncy of a ride the ground is.

When I first started playing and watching others, I was a bit surprised it was reliable enough to use competitively.
 

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