Foot speed vs Upper body speed?

SuperWookie

Birdie Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2019
This question is mostly directed towards Sidewinder, but anyone that would consider themselves a swing guru can chime in if they know the answer. I've been having some really weird issues with my form lately (after getting off to a really good start this Spring. It's all been going down hill since). And after seeing the comment on TT's form, made me wonder about a few things and thought I'd ask for your opinion.

So I was taking a lot of the ideas of what TT talks about in his throw and using them over the last year or so. I like how he's simple, slow and doesn't have a huge run up. Seems to do everything very smooth and at a reasonable pace of movement. And after incorporating some of that into my own swing last Fall and early this Spring, it was having a great effect on my throws. I was throwing a bit farther, more consistently, but most importantly, accurately and with ease. It was fantastic? I shot the lowest rd of my life this spring (-8) and was actually having fun playing.

But it's been going downhill ever since May/June. And something I'm thinking about, when self reflecting on my form, is the idea of fast feet vs slow upper body. Or slow feet vs fast upper body. And at a field while practicing recently, I decided to speed up my lower body movements, while not worrying about my upper body speed. I was just working on trying to move my feet quicker through the X step and into the plant, and low and behold, my throws instantly started getting better. Which made me think, does moving your feet quicker through the process, while trying to stay slower and more deliberate with your upper body result in better throws in general? I'm thinking that this idea, for me at least, is a good thing, but not really sure. So looking to get people's educated opinions on this.

My thinking is, since I'm usually a yanker/puller with my arm and upper body when I make a poor throw, and since I move so slowly and deliberately with my footwork, that my body isn't even planted properly before I start the throw. Which causes all sorts of problems. Whereas in my short time playing Disc, when I really concentrate on planting first, my throws are always better. Which made me come to the conclusion that maybe I should be moving my lower body/feet through the steps and X step at a quicker pace, to allow my plant leg to actually plant first, before I start any forward movement? That my feet being quicker, won't allow my common tendency of my upper body trying to yank the disc to even happen. Or happen as easily. Because my feet will be moving through the steps quicker, it will allow my plant foot to plant sooner, which will then allow the rest of the swing and the kinetic sequence to happen in a much better way, than it does when I'm constantly yanking everything right.

Thoughts?
 
You ahould be able to pause more or less before the final step/stride. Weight on back foot is the key to be able to stride and time the plant.

But sure the general speed of your should be in harmony, so maybe a quicker foot pace makes your timing easier.


What maybe is equally imortant is to keep footage of when you are throwing well so that when the down spiral happens you can rewatch, also make some keynotes to what you feel/are doing.
 
My thought is the change in form took time and part of your body changed, but the other part didn't keep up.

I think it is unnecessary to run at the shot, I think its silly for the most part, but it has its place. Good footwork can generate insane power, just like good form on a standstill can get great distances.

So, when you slowed down, some of your mechanics probably changed, but you were not necessarily focusing on all the mechanics, and while one part improved, the other part lagged behind.

Footwork is HUGE in the swing. how wide you stagger, how wide you plant, all these things have changes on the upper body and what your timing does.
Its a bit of a frustrating topic as there is no good answer.
 
Related content and seconding guru/pro chime in request:

Older thread on rhythm in the backhand + connections to music.
https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=136535

3:1 tempo in golf

Anecdotally, I use music frequently when I try to integrate new form at this point. Waltz tempo is very intuitive to me since I work on that dance the most. Suddenly today, the BH swing is closer to 3:1 backswing:downswing tempo as the mechanics improve. There is usually an emphasis on the "1" beat in the Waltz just like starting the DG backswing. The two following beats are that "coiling" process in the backswing. The next 1 beat is the sudden+much faster downswing/uncoiling.

I'd personally want to keep the x-step in close to the same timing: 1 step each beat, then 3 beats in the backswing/separation, then 1 beat thru the downswing (debunk, anyone?)
 
Related content and seconding guru/pro chime in request:

Older thread on rhythm in the backhand + connections to music.
https://www.dgcoursereview.com/forums/showthread.php?t=136535

3:1 tempo in golf

Anecdotally, I use music frequently when I try to integrate new form at this point. Waltz tempo is very intuitive to me. Suddenly today, the BH swing is closer to 3:1 backswing:downswing tempo as the mechanics improve. There is usually an emphasis on the "1" beat in the Waltz just like starting the DG backswing and sudden+much faster downswing.

I'd personally want to keep the x-step in close to the same timing: 1 step each beat, then 3 beats in the backswing/separation, then 1 beat thru the downswing (debunk, anyone?)

thanks, now i have "the stroke" stuck in my head.
 
Yanker/pullers need to keep the disc in front of your body, and only backswing at the last moment before plant. By ‘in front’ I mean on the ‘basket side,’ so right of the right hip for RHBH until JUST before plant.

You’ll find a hundred pros that don’t do this, but they aren’t yanker/pullers.
 
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