[Other] Having few molds vs. having many

Why on earth are we still comparing average joe bags to elite touring professional bags? (not specifically you SD, lots of others too) It's silly to think there is any way to compare someone who has a full time job and/or family and plays even as little as 15-20 rounds a month, with someone who is literally employed to throw discs (and gets them for free, to boot)

It's really a terrible thing to do.
 
The touring pro's are not an example of what works and what doesn't. It is an example of how both strategies work.

Guys like Koling throw 15 plus molds and are successful with it. They like certain discs for forehand and others for backhand. They like certain molds for overhand as well.

Then a guy like Philo throws 5 molds only. Aviars, Rocs, Teebirds, Firebords, and Destroyers.

Drawing anything other than the fact that both options can work for different players is ridiculous.
 
The problem with Koling as an example is that he’s a new team member and is throwing a bunch of stuff to figure out what works. I bet anything that his mold count will drop as time goes on.
 
The problem with Koling as an example is that he’s a new team member and is throwing a bunch of stuff to figure out what works. I bet anything that his mold count will drop as time goes on.

I could see your point if he had just switched. But he moved to Innova in January. That's plenty of time and hundreds of rounds to get it figured out.
 
The problem with Koling as an example is that he’s a new team member and is throwing a bunch of stuff to figure out what works. I bet anything that his mold count will drop as time goes on.

Disagree. Big Jerm carries different molds to meet any situation on the tournament courses he plays. Big Jerm is also a forehand and backhand thrower, and carries mold to meet his needs for throwing either way.

And his commenting buddy Nate Sexton (2017 USDGC Champ) is anything but a mold minimalist, carrying many molds, and for the same reasons as Big Jerm (forehand/backhand, etc.). And Nate didn't just switch to Innova.
 
Chucker: "This disc does X."
Disc Golfer: "I can make this disc do X, Y, and Z. And, in a pinch, A and B."

Me: I can make this disc do X, Y, and Z. And, in a pinch, A and B. But I don't mind having a bunch of molds in my bag that can all do X, Y, and Z (and A and B and C), especially because that's part of the fun in disc golf. I also realize that the mold that I pick, while fun, isn't nearly as important as executing the shot.
 
FRIZBEEZ! COLLECT THEM ALL!

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Yeah. After 11 years. 11. Years.

Yes but I never played much between 2009-2015 during those years I did way more Running. I did play again last year and this year I determined the disc was dead. I do have a 2008 Star Valkyrie also 170 grams I should have retired immediately as it got a odd little tiny piece of plastic taken off of it from hitting a root on the first throw with the disc ever right before the Ice bowl began, was making sure players could throw on the tee pads, that it was not a sheet of Ice. Had to go out to all of them. The odd little tiny piece of plastic taken off never affected the flight of said disc. I do see that the old Star Valkyrie has a smaller rim then my new Champion Valkyrie and that I have to power the smaller worn in rim just a bit more then my new Champion Valkyrie. I do have to seemingly every 2-3 years buy a new DX Dragon as my old worn in ones get so flippy I a less power thrower can almost turn it into a roller when it gets retired. Makes me want to keep the old one in the bag labeled roller, so I use it as a roller only. I have had the DX Dragon I am using since 2013 and after what would be about 2 years of play during time I would play regularly for me, I need to get a new disc. I should then label the old one a roller then work on getting that into a Flip roller for the rare chance I need a Roller disc.
 
Me: I can make this disc do X, Y, and Z. And, in a pinch, A and B. But I don't mind having a bunch of molds in my bag that can all do X, Y, and Z (and A and B and C), especially because that's part of the fun in disc golf. I also realize that the mold that I pick, while fun, isn't nearly as important as executing the shot.

I can get discs to do X, Y, and Z, but not A or B. I have to have another disc for A and B. I do have a disc though that can only do X as I have tried to make the disc do more but a Discraft ESP Impact wants to only go straight thanks to the big bead on the bottom. I am not good enough to get the other discs to do A and B, A and B get covered by another disc that does A, B, and C.
 
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It is very nice to find those few molds that really work for you.. makes everything way easier to when you're needing to replace disc
 
In an effort to stir things up some more, I would like to say that I absolutely agree with those advocating that one should learn to throw the molds that they have, and become proficient with those molds. But, as far as trying new molds, I view throwing new molds in a similar way that people view playing new courses.

I want the experience of seeing what the new mold will do, and trying to work with it. When I find consistent success using a particular mold on a particular hole, I place that mold aside and try a new one instead, because I like the challenge of working the hole with a different disc. I believe that there is a lot to be learned from doing this. And, it is fun.

If one is looking for the easiest path to success on a disc golf course, then why are they playing new courses with which they are unfamiliar? Just play the same course over and over again for the rest of your life, and dial in each hole so that you can score really well on those holes...again and again and again.

Boring.


We all want to try new things, whether it be courses, or molds, or whatever.

There are some in this thread who are stating that they have played on large numbers of disc golf courses. Anyone that boasts of playing on a large number of courses, and then criticizes others for trying many new molds is a hypocrite as far as I am concerned. Or, they just don't get it that the new mold person is in fact just like them.
 
I think the biggest point team minimalism is trying to get across is to learn a few discs very well FIRST. Once proficient at release angles, nose angles, intentional OAT, cut rollers/grenades/flex shots/both BH and FH etc. etc. etc.

THEN do whatever you want with a ton of molds. That way you can truly compare say a Sidewinder and a Vision based off of more than the "four numbers" or manufacturer description.



IMHO.
 
I'm in the fewest mold, fewest amount of disc camp. I'm not a believer in needing more than 10-12 discs over 6-8 molds for a round of golf.
 
I'm in the fewest mold, fewest amount of disc camp. I'm not a believer in needing more than 10-12 discs over 6-8 molds for a round of golf.

Agreed. I happen to have 21 in my full bag right now, but I very frequently play with my Nutsac:D with nothing more than a Gravity Clutch, ESP Buzzz, FLX Drone, and either Star TB/Proton Crave or Champ TB/ DX TB. My scores between the two bags are minimal.
 

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