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Throwing the Anhyzer - Technique and Form Questions

djjeremiahj

Double Eagle Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
1,042
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SF
What do you adjust to get this throw to be reliable, and consistent?

I've been working in a field to get this throw as i have a katana and destroyer that are still waaay too overstable. when i throw them properly (with anhyzer), the discs turn over and fly as i would hope.....

question...
How do you throw this with proficiency? I've tried adjusting the disc in my hand (grip) and lower it in my palm (vs. regular throw)... this seems to work, but i lose power. My thumb seems to add an awkward feeling....

i've tried to adjust my wrist, but the "feel" of the throw seems awkward and seems to be contrary to the other wrist motions (nose down, slightly cocked backward, etc).

Suggestions?
(I searched for a solution, but most questions are about discs not grip/form)


Anhyzer - When the far edge of the disc is pointed UPWARD on a throw...
if right hand back hand the disc would be angled as such -> "\" (as opposed to a "hyzer" that is "/"; or downward facing)
 
I'm not quite sure I understand the question, you want to know how to do it but you don't want to know grip/form? Anhyzers have everything to do with form. Anhyzers can be thrown with stable (not overstable) discs, and understable discs. Adjusting to the stability of the disc requires form changes and power changes.
 
Adjust your release angle using your shoulders. Your shoulders should follow the same plane as the initial trajectory of the disc. So, throwing an anhyzer will probably require you to arch your back a bit.
 
I would strongly recommend working with slower, stable discs....like a Roc, Buzzz, Gazelle, Eagle, and so on. I tried to throw flex shots right off the bat with faster drivers and only frustrated myself. It seems to take alot of spin for the disc to hold in this line, when it really wants to "flex" out.

Throwing annys with stable mids (instead of using understable mids for turnovers) is a great way to get comfortable with the motion at a bit lower power requirement.

I tend to not arch so much but rather lift the release plane and pull a bit higher on the chest...and keep the nose down!
 
Here are the mistakes I see most people make when trying to throw an anhyzer:

1) Their brain doesn't trust that it will work so it won't let them aim left enough or high enough so they end up hitting what they're trying to anny around.
2) They don't follow through low. Their arm follows through straight around and it causes the disc to pull out of the anny way too soon.

In closing: If you really focus on where you need to aim and then put the disc out there with anny on it and a low follow through, then it will be a beautiful thing.
 
1) Their brain doesn't trust that it will work so it won't let them aim left enough or high enough so they end up hitting what they're trying to anny around.

/\ This used to be a major problem for me. In field practice, I worked on the anhyzer a ton, and started turning them over like a horrible roller.

It took a while for me, but if you spend some time and throw a bunch of anhyzers, followed by rollers or vice versa, you should be able to figure out that "sweet spot" that is needed to hit the anhyzer line.

Another thing that helped me was to mentally "commit" to the shot before taking the first step in your approach/run up/whatever. If you can convince your brain that you only want to throw an anhyzer, you will build the brain and muscle memory to do it consistently.
 
Is it just me, or did they just basically say use either a beat version of this disc, or this disc, or cheat and use forehand?

I didnt seem to feel like I got a lot out of that video.
 
Adjust your release angle using your shoulders. Your shoulders should follow the same plane as the initial trajectory of the disc. So, throwing an anhyzer will probably require you to arch your back a bit.

This.

Watch some elite pros throw anny's (NOT turnover shots) and you'll see this technique is pretty common.
 
I have had the same problems, and learning with my Fuse first, and then more stable mids like the Core, Medius and Cro have helped me.
 
Say you're on a baseball diamond at home plate - look at the center fielder, but imagine your hand sweeping by the third baseman. YOu're chucking it up over his head with the disc banked to the right ever so slightly. A straight shot high and to the left with a little bank on it...
 
As has been said, it's all in the shoulders. Other than that, it's just a regular throw. So let your muscle memory do the work, and just be sure to angle your shoulders with the angle you want the disc to hold.
 
Try a Sidewinder or Roadrunner as mentioned. They will help a great deal while still being good high-speed drivers.
 
With your pull-back you're going to start high and finish low. If you want to see an exaggerated anhyzer form, watch people throw backhand rollers.

The concept doesn't clash with nose down at all. Nose down is very important to make a disc hold an anhyzer, especially drivers. Nose down gets the NOSE down, not the wing. The wing on an anhyzer is up, the wing is independant of the nose angle. You can angle a disc nose down and then orientate it anhyzer just as easily as hyzer.

When you are letting go your arm should be pointing at your target. Hold the disc out in front of you. Turn your palm up while maintaining a nose down wrist angle. Anhyzer. Turn your palm down while maintaining nose down wrist angle. Hyzer. It's that simple, now just add follow through. The grip is no different, it's just body positioning and release angles. My form isn't the cleanest but here's me throwing a few:


Watch the difference in how I throw my black putter and pink midrange, then fast forward to 1:20 and watch me throw a BH roller for a more extreme example of anhyzer form.


 
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Is it just me, or did they just basically say use either a beat version of this disc, or this disc, or cheat and use forehand?

I didnt seem to feel like I got a lot out of that video.

:hfive: Glad I'm not the only one that thought this! But then u have to remind yerself that it is a DISCRAFT utube channel, ha.
 
I've been throwing everything "anyhzer" lately. No matter what I want to do.

This damn game can be frustrating, just when I make a breakthrough, another problem starts coming up.
 
I think it is critical to get the follow through correctly. Sometimes when I throw an anhyzer, I might have an anhyzer grip, but not follow through with my arm going from high to low. Thus what happens is the disc will start out anhyzer do to the grip, and quickly straightens out and then fades back left, RHBH throw. If you follow through with the arm pulling high on the chest and pulling through with the arm heading down towards the ground, then that helps get the right release angle. Also arching your back a bit helps to get this pull through going in the right direction.
 
great responses everyone... i will go to the field today and test...

just for clarification, I have understable drivers....

i am trying to put anhyzer on some of my new / "not broken in" discs to get them to fly as i would want/expect. I also want to learn the shot as there are times when i need the anzhyzer to compensate for some course condition and i need to get a "touch more control" out of one of my discs (wind issues, force a turnover, etc...)

For me, i have a katana and destroyer that wont turnover easily, and as a result, i am losing 50' (+/-). <- one is a newish Star Katana, the other is a 168 "light: star destroyer.
I already have bomber discs that i can push to 400' but having 2 discs that are supposed to but wont, is what i am practicing in the field. (i'm using these two to expand my shot selection and understanding....)
 

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