Top Rated Junior Form Check

jph424

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This is my 9-year old daughter. When people ask her what she wants to be when she grows up, she says a pro disc golfer (in spite of spending a lot more time doing gymnastics than disc golf). She loves this sport. Her form seems to naturally get better and better and so I'm trying to just keep it as fun as possible so she keeps loving it. I am also not a form expert so I very rarely offer her any tips unless it's something blatant. I am curious though what you see that would help in the future. Thank you!

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Looks pretty awesome, I don't think I'd mess with it. Looks quite similar to Jen Allen who was also into gymnastics and current distance champ.
 
From a dad who coached his daughters in basketball, softball, and rugby, stick to lots of encouragement. It might be appropriate to obtain some professional coaching in the next year or two. Be very careful about vetting coaches before you let them work with your daughter. Statisically, more young people quit a sport because of dissatisfaction with a coach opposed to disinterest in the sport.
 
From a dad who coached his daughters in basketball, softball, and rugby, stick to lots of encouragement. It might be appropriate to obtain some professional coaching in the next year or two. Be very careful about vetting coaches before you let them work with your daughter. Statisically, more young people quit a sport because of dissatisfaction with a coach opposed to disinterest in the sport.
Thanks! She is the youngest of 5 so I learned from experience that encouragement works way better for the long run than critique. We have 2 rules for every disc golf round: 1. Have fun; 2. Keep a positive attitude. As long as she loves it, she will keep playing and as long as she keeps playing, she will improve and I will get to keep playing with her and caddying for her which is a blast.
 
Man, you must be SO proud of her.

As long as she's having fun, everything is all good! With her age in mind, she'll gradually get better and better body mechanics as she grows, that's the beauty of kids doing sports, they just get it lol.

She already haves a REALLY good swing, look at how her arms just slings the disc out of the pocket, most adults is would kill for that!

Great job "dad"!
 
Man, you must be SO proud of her.

As long as she's having fun, everything is all good! With her age in mind, she'll gradually get better and better body mechanics as she grows, that's the beauty of kids doing sports, they just get it lol.

She already haves a REALLY good swing, look at how her arms just slings the disc out of the pocket, most adults is would kill for that!

Great job "dad"!
Very proud! Even more proud that she is a great card mate and friend to those she plays with. F8E7A45E-79A0-49A3-B30B-289A6D9B043B.jpeg
 
my son is 13 and started playing when he was 4. His form basically naturally evolved, and at least in his case, it was way more important to have fun and play than worry about technique. He still loves disc golf and is on the Innova junior team. you might want to check out some videos if/when she starts to throw forehands, partly to help her not hurt her elbow or shoulder - but maybe only if she wants to do that
 
oh - and the one tip I've seen pros give consistently to kids is to try to keep the disc close to your chest on the forward swing of a backhand (and to lead with the elbow in some sense, which is kind of related). I'm also not a form expert! She'll probably do those things naturally more and more.
 
Wow! Her form is insane! The only tip I would give is try to move around the disc to build the most consistently possible.
 
Note how Simon keeps it in one place. I know it might be hard for her to do and if she can't that's fine cause this isn't necessary it can just help with consistency.
 
my son is 13 and started playing when he was 4. His form basically naturally evolved, and at least in his case, it was way more important to have fun and play than worry about technique. He still loves disc golf and is on the Innova junior team. you might want to check out some videos if/when she starts to throw forehands, partly to help her not hurt her elbow or shoulder - but maybe only if she wants to do that
Great. It is fun playing with the kids especially once they are good enough to play courses that challenge you too. Say hi if you see us at junior worlds.

Regarding forehand, she is actually doing more lefty backhand right now than forehand but both are coming along nicely. My sport growing up was a baseball and was a pitcher so am very careful of forehand given the inherent risks with that motion relative to backhand.
 
Wow! Her form is insane! The only tip I would give is try to move around the disc to build the most consistently possible.
Thanks! I have mentioned that it might be good to not have the "swing" from front to back and rather to keep it static but she likes it so that may be something for down the road. Interestingly, she doesn't do it when she is throwing on anny, only on straight and hyzer shots. Not sure why that is.

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Thanks! I have mentioned that it might be good to not have the "swing" from front to back and rather to keep it static but she likes it so that may be something for down the road. Interestingly, she doesn't do it when she is throwing on anny, only on straight and hyzer shots. Not sure why that is.

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Some of the most consistent players use a pump like McBeth, Feldberg, Schultz, MJ, Philo.
 
Some of the most consistent players use a pump like McBeth, Feldberg, Schultz, MJ, Philo.
I've never really thought of it as a pump but that makes sense. Isaac also very consistent with a pump. She just goes straight from arm extended at the target/aligning into the swing.
 
Some of the most consistent players use a pump like McBeth, Feldberg, Schultz, MJ, Philo.
While true the only one of those people that actually throws far is Paul. Then if you look at most of the far throwers the disc is fairly stationary. I don't know for sure how much the pump factors into people like Philo not being able to throw far.
 
While true the only one of those people that actually throws far is Paul. Then if you look at most of the far throwers the disc is fairly stationary. I don't know for sure how much the pump factors into people like Philo not being able to throw far.
Lever length and athleticism plays a huge factor too. Also MJ, Philo and Schultz never really try to throw hard. They would definitely be able to throw further if they wanted to.
 
Jph, looking good! I also wouldn't mess with it too much at that stage/age and let things develop naturally for a bit.

While true the only one of those people that actually throws far is Paul. Then if you look at most of the far throwers the disc is fairly stationary. I don't know for sure how much the pump factors into people like Philo not being able to throw far.
Just some form academia here:

I do think you can botch a pump and make it contribute to inconsistency/less power just like anything else in form. On the other hand a lot of very far throwers used it in some point in their development to master momentum, rhythm, and forces in motion, and it can play an important role in aiming when used well. One of the most important lessons I learned studying here was to study how far and consistent throwers initially developed their moves.

Note that there is a continuum from a full pendulum pump to subtle, tiny pumps. Simon and Paul both currently appear to have very subtle elbow pumps depending on what you're looking at. Both have also used versions of fuller pendula (Paul more horizontal, Simon more vertical). Koling also here, who interestingly probably is leaving a little on the table with his form but that's a slightly different story:



More older school examples: Stokely and Jenkins

If the disc is stationary, a given player's ideal move is just moving the body past the disc to achieve separation and load in the shift. If the disc is pumping or penduluming, it is contributing momentum to the move toward the target (and usually vertically to some extent), and the body and disc move synchronized past one another to achieve separation and load. The pendulum seems to teach players who have poor rhythm and momentum mastery some parts of form, and takes some of the burden off of the legs to create a weight shift because the arm/disc mass are swinging forward and then back.

I do think certainly full pendulum pumps are becoming less common at the top competitive level and I am aware that some coaches clearly dislike them (or simply don't use them). Sidewinder tends to advise them for people struggling with specific form issues. Some people seem to respond well, some of them never quite click. You can also find developmental examples that didn't spend a lot of time with pendula. I am still interested in the differences and implications.

Edit: per below, you tend to see more pumps when people are going for more raw distance - the momentum benefit of the pump builds more potential power on the rest of the above.
 
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Jph, looking good! I also wouldn't mess with it too much at that stage/age and let things develop naturally for a bit.


Just some form academia here:

I do think you can botch a pump and make it contribute to inconsistency/less power just like anything else in form. On the other hand a lot of very far throwers used it in some point in their development to master momentum, rhythm, and forces in motion, and it can play an important role in aiming when used well. One of the most important lessons I learned studying here was to study how far and consistent throwers initially developed their moves.

Note that there is a continuum from a full pendulum pump to subtle, tiny pumps. Simon and Paul both currently appear to have very subtle elbow pumps depending on what you're looking at. Both have also used versions of fuller pendula (Paul more horizontal, Simon more vertical). Koling also here, who interestingly probably is leaving a little on the table with his form but that's a slightly different story:



More older school examples: Stokely and Jenkins

If the disc is stationary, a given player's ideal move is just moving the body past the disc to achieve separation and load in the shift. If the disc is pumping or penduluming, it is contributing momentum to the move toward the target (and usually vertically to some extent), and the body and disc move synchronized past one another to achieve separation and load. The pendulum seems to teach players who have poor rhythm and momentum mastery some parts of form, and takes some of the burden off of the legs to create a weight shift because the arm/disc mass are swinging forward and then back.

I do think certainly full pendulum pumps are becoming less common at the top competitive level and I am aware that some coaches clearly dislike them (or simply don't use them). Sidewinder tends to advise them for people struggling with specific form issues. Some people seem to respond well, some of them never quite click. You can also find developmental examples that didn't spend a lot of time with pendula. I am still interested in the differences and implications.

Great video and explanation. I just went back and looked and she has always had the full extension at the target as the start to her swing even when she was starting.


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I am curious if the pros who had significant pumps also used significant pumps throwing anny because she doesn't have nearly as large of a pump throwing anny for some reason.
 
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